Tuesday, April 22, 2014

No. 269 Air Force One lands in Everett, WA

Paine Field Airport
Everett, Washington
April 22nd, 2014

One the 1 month after the Oso, Washington landslide President Obama arrived in Washington State to meet with state officials, local first responders and families affected by the landslide.
At 12:42pm Air Force One appeared over waters of Possession Sound on a 5 mile final and was cleared for landing on 16R at Paine Airport in Everett, WA. 6 minutes later the queen of the skies ,a late model 1990's Boeing 747-200, touched down in Snohomish County with sunbreaks.
President Obama met Washington State officials awaiting his arrival at the bottom of the air stairs and then boarded USMC VH-3 helicopters to be flown to KAWO Arlington. VH-3s were escorted by 3 HMX-1 MV-22B Osprey.


POTUS arrival at PAE 4/22/2014
onlookers arrive at Future of Flight in Everett, WA for POTUS arrival
POTUS Flag waver

USA Air Force One / Boeing VC-25A (747-2G4B) / 82-8000 at PAE
USA Air Force One / Boeing VC-25A (747-2G4B) / 82-29000 short final
USA Air Force One / Boeing VC-25A (747-2G4B) / 82-8000 at PAE
Air Force One flares on arrival at Paine Field next the Boeing Flight Line
SAM7311 C-32A VIP Transport
SAM Flight follows AF1. ALong for the Asian ride 
After touring the Oso Landslide from the air and ground and meeting with local President Obama returned to Paine Field aboard Marine One and at 17:15 (5:15pm PDT) Air Force One was wheel up headed for Japan.
Air Force One departing Everett, WA 4/22/2014
Wheel up for Japan Air Force One
Air Force One departing Everett, WA 4/22/2014

Air Force One departing Everett, WA 4/22/2014

C-32A VIP Transport departing
C-32A VIP Transport departing Paine Field behind AF1
  Watch the National Geographic Documentary Inside Air Force One

Monday, April 21, 2014

No. 268 Meadowdale Beach Park

Meadowdale Beach Park
6026 156th Sw
Edmonds, WA 98036
MAP IT 

Meadowdale Beach Park surrounds the lower section of the Lunds Gulch Creek north of Edmonds, WA. The 108 acre parks features trails that meander through old-growth forests and lead down to an access point to the salt water beach.



meadowdale
Picnic Shelter and play fields 

meadowdale3
BNSF Rail Road Tunnel 
Meadowdale Beach County Park
after heavy rains the train tunnel can become flooded with runoff 
meadowdale6

meadowdale5

meadowdale4

meadowdale7
Low Tide
meadowdale8
North bound BNSF train 
Meadowdale Beach County Park

Meadowdale Beach County Park
Abandoned barge 
Meadowdale Beach County Park

Meadowdale Beach County Park
Meadowdale Beach County Park
Boat Ramp 
Meadowdale Beach County Park
Sunset Bay 

Sunday, April 20, 2014

No. 267 Recap Of Doolittle Raid Afternoon

Historic Flight Foundation
Paine Field
Everett, WA
April 19, 2014

Saturday morning started off promising with a few sunbreaks around Snohomish County. But by 11am overcast clouds started rolling in from the south east and a light drizzle soon followed. Owner and pilot John Sessions begun his B-25D Mitchell pre-flight just after 11am but moved the pre-flight discussion out of the rain and inside the hangar.
A few of the volunteers and myself took shelter from the rain under the wings of the B-25 and waited for the V-22s and Vh-3s to startup and take off on their Presidential Transportation exercise over Snohomish County and Arlington Airport.
Although the rain made the afternoon a little uncomfortable there was still plenty of activity on the airport including an American Bald Eagle soaring overhead, take off of V22s, VH-3s, a Dreamifter, Boeing 737s and 777s.
Here is a recap in video and images.


HMX-1 MV-22B Executive Transport Taking Off
HMX-1 MV-22B takeoff  configuration
HMX-1 MV-22B Executive Transport Taking Off
HMX-1 MV-22B forward flight transition 
HMX-1 MV-22B Executive Transport Taking Off
HMX-1 MV-22B Take Off
HMX-1 MV-22B inbound for landing
HMX-1 MV-22B returning from Arlington Airport 
HMX-1 MV-22B landing configuration
HMX-1 MV-22B landing configuration
HMX-1 VH-3D Marine Corps Marine 1
HMX-1 VH-3D Marine Corps Marine 1
HMX-1 VH-3D Marine Corps Marine 1
HMX-1 VH-3D Marine Corps Marine 1
Air China B-2047
Air China B-2047 Boeing 777-300ER
Historic Flight Foundation  N88972 B-25D
Historic Flight Foundation  N88972 B-25D

Friday, April 18, 2014

No. 266 72 Anniversary of Doolittle Raid on Japan

Historic Flight Foundation 
http://historicflight.org/hf/

ADDRESS

10719 Bernie Webber Drive
Mukilteo, WA 98275

PHONE

(425) 348-3200
Saturday April 19th, 2014
Paine Field, Everett Washington 


Historic Flight Foundation will honor Lt. Col. Edward J. Saylor (ret.), one of four surviving Doolittle Raiders, on the occasion of the 72nd anniversary of the raid on Tokyo. A B-25 aerial demonstration will begin at 4 followed by a gourmet dinner at 5:30. Jonna Doolittle Hoppes, grandaughter of Jimmy Doolittle, leader of the raid, will speak after dinner. Following Jonna’s remarks, Lt. Col. Saylor will offer his reflections. To conclude the evening, HFF will present the film “Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo” in an environment reminiscent of a 1940s movie house. Tickets are $50. Click here to purchase. Students and families are encouraged to come. Seating is limited to 250. Proceeds will benefit the “Edward J. Saylor Aviation Scholarship Fund.”







HFF B-25 Mitchel "Grumpy"
B-25D "Grumpy" on the flightline during VAW
B25 Mitchell Bomber on HFF ramp after flight
Grumpy on the ramo 
1943 B-25D Mitchel Bomber "Grumpy"
low pass 
B-25 Mitchel "Grumpy"
Head on with B-25D
beating the sunset
Short final before sunset 



Wikipedia Article:
 The Doolittle Raid, also known as the Tokyo Raid, on 18 April 1942, was an air raid by the United States on the Japanese capital Tokyo and other places on Honshu island during World War II, the first air raid to strike the Japanese Home Islands. It demonstrated that Japan itself was vulnerable to American air attack, was retaliation for the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, provided an important boost to U.S. morale, and damaged Japanese morale. The raid was planned and led by Lieutenant ColonelJames "Jimmy" DoolittleU.S. Army Air Forces.
Sixteen U.S. Army Air Forces B-25B Mitchell medium bombers were launched without fighter escort from the U.S. Navy's aircraft carrier USS Hornet deep in the Western Pacific Ocean, each with a crew of five men. The plan called for them to bomb military targets in Japan, and to continue westward to land in China—landing a medium bomber on Hornet was impossible. Fifteen of the aircraft reached China, and the other one landed in the Soviet Union. All but three of the crew survived, but all the aircraft were lost. Eight crewmen were captured by the Japanese Army in China; three of these were executed. The B-25 that landed in the Soviet Union atVladivostok was confiscated and its crew interned for more than a year. Fourteen crews, except for one crewman, returned either to the United States or to American forces.[1][2]
After the raid, the Japanese Imperial Army conducted a massive sweep through the eastern coastal provinces of China, in an operation now known as the Zhejiang-Jiangxi Campaign, searching for the surviving American airmen and applying retribution on the Chinese who aided them, in an effort to prevent this part of China from being used again for an attack on Japan. An estimated 250,000 Chinese civilians were killed by the Japanese during this operation.[3][4]
The raid caused negligible material damage to Japan, only hitting non-military targets or missing completely but it succeeded in its goal of raising American morale and casting doubt in Japan on the ability of its military leaders to defend their home islands. It also caused Japan to withdraw its powerful aircraft carrier force from the Indian Ocean to defend their Home Islands, and the raid contributed to Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto's decision to attack Midway Island in the Central Pacific—an attack that turned into a decisive strategic defeat of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) by the U.S. Navy in the Battle of Midway. Doolittle, who initially believed that loss of all his aircraft would lead to his being court-martialled, received the Medal of Honor and was promoted two steps to Brigadier general.

Thursday, April 17, 2014

No. 265 Springtime is a great time to visit Washington State Water Falls

As we enter the 5 week of Spring of 2014 the flowers are in bloom everywhere it seems and the weather is producing more blue skies and warmer temps consistently. Which puts most people in a happier mood.
Temperatures in the lowlands are staying above 40 degrees and the temperatures in the mountains are getting warmer as well. This means the snow and ice that fell and accumulated since last October is beginning to thaw and looking for a way to the ocean. 
Now is the best time to go out and see waterfalls running at full levels. The April Spring Showers combined with ice and snow melt add dramatic volumes of water rushing down the sides of mountains and cascading over the edges of waterfalls. 
Though some trails still may have residual snow and may be muddy they are worth the hike. During the summer months when forest floors and trails are dry there is upwards of 60% less water moving down the mountain causing larger falls to run at low levels and many smaller waterfalls disappear as their water sources dry up. 


Here is a list of waterfalls inside Washington State Parks that are worth a hike:




Palouse Region Palouse Falls - Eastern Washington
The Palouse Falls is tucked away in the Eastern part of Washington State. After a very windy drive, including a few miles on dirt roads, you can find this amazing location. The falls consists of an upper falls with a drop of ~20 feet (6.1 m) which lies 1,000 feet (300 m) north northwest of the main drop, and a lower falls, with a drop of ~180 feet (55 m).



Wallace Falls State ParkWallace Falls - Gold Bar, WA
Cascade FallsWallace Falls, named after homesteaders Joe and Sarah Kwayaylsh members of the Skykomish tribe, is a 4,735 acre forest land on the western slope of the North Cascade Mountain range in Snohomish County. The park has three back country lakes, Jay Lake, Shaw Lake and Wallace Lake which are connected via the Wallace River. The river trickles, snakes, gurgles and plunges its way through the park until the valley basin. 







Cascade Falls - Orcas Island, WA
At about 40 feet tall, Cascade Falls is the largest waterfall in the San Juan Islands. Cascade Creek squiggles down a flume, dropping through a jumble of logs and branches before it veils out over a broad bulbous face into a small grotto lined with several old growth cedar trees. 




Rustic Falls, Cascade Creek, Moran State Park Rustic Falls - Orcas Island, WA 
Rustic Falls is part of Cascade Creek, which runs between Mountain Lake and Cascade Lake in Moran State Park. The 0.8 mile walk from the trail head is located on the east side of Cascade Lake in Moran State Park Orcas Island